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I have been baking cakes lately, and putting things in jars. I am also poised before the chasm of a great transition, which has me somewhat preoccupied; just hanging out nervously, waiting to hear back from those voices in the wind. So I’m keeping busy with kitchen stuff.

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I am not exactly sure why I am posting this recipe when I consider that I ripped it from a page of O Magazine while in a doctor’s waiting room and it’s all over the internet anyways. However, when I consider how much I actually enjoyed both eating the finished product and the way I felt after, it is totes obvious. These things are so weird, yet so good! You feel like you’ve just eaten power pellets.

I got most of the ingredients from the bulk section of my hippie grocery store, but they can be procured all over the internet. Warning: not cheap. Just so you know.

I don’t have a dehydrator, so I just stuck a loaded baking sheet in my oven on very low heat overnight.

EQUIPMENT YOU WILL NEED:
A spice grinder, nut grinder or appropriated coffee grinder
A silicone baking mat or parchment paper
The usual suspects: bowl, fork, spoon, measuring accoutrements

INGREDIENTS:
1 C. chia seeds, finely ground
1/2 C. pecan or macadamia nuts, finely ground
1/2 C. dried mulberries
1/2 C. mesquite powder
1/4 C maca root powder
1 Tbsp. ground cinnamon
Coconut butter and maple syrup for eating

THE RECIPE:
Mix ingredients in a bowl. Add 2 C. water and blend with a fork. Form rounds on a baking tray and put in an oven set to warm over night — no more than 115F — or dehydrate at 115F for 7 hours. Peel them off the tray and put on a plate; serve with the coconut butter & syrup.

Happy Thanksgiving.

1 squash (acorn/kabocha/butternut etc.)
Olive oil
Fresh ground pepper

3 Tbsp. white miso
3 Tbsp. rice vinegar
1 Tbsp. maple syrup/agave/brown rice syrup etc., more or less to taste
1 Tbsp. dry yellow mustard

Heat oven to 375F. Halve the squash and scrape the seed cavity clean. Pour a small amount of oil into each cavity and use it to baste the entire cut surface. Dust with pepper and place cut-side-down on a baking sheet. Bake in the oven for 25 minutes or so, about the amount of time it takes you to repot a couple of plants or listen to 1/2 of an LP, until the squash is relatively tender.

Whisk the remaining ingredients together until smooth. Remove squash from oven, flip, and baste the cut surface with the sauce. Return to oven for another 10 minutes or until squash is soft and the surface is toasty brown and caramelized.

Eat the squash with a spoon straight from the baking dish like an uncivilized human, or slice and serve on plates in front of company.

This is one of my most favorite everyday cakes, since it is reasonably simple to prepare and it includes two of my most favorite flavors, pears and cardamom.  I first made this cake at my sister’s house where I pulled the recipe from one of her cookbooks; I then copied the recipe onto the back of a receipt or something similarly scrappish and promptly lost it in a pile of paper; and then I rediscovered it today while cleaning off my desk.  The thing is that I didn’t write down whose recipe it is or what book it came from, so if there are any sleuths out there who can clue me in to its origin, please do.  Otherwise we’ll all just have to wait until I go to see my sister again.

It is called “Buttermilk Country Cake” and I am positive it is from a Maida Heatter-influenced cookbook.  I made a Pear Upside-Down Cake using an actual Maida Heatter buttermilk cake recipe for a dinner party in Alaska, and it was just not the same.  For starts, the M. H. version was enormous in comparison, like double-size the progeny’s version, and for seconds, it was a bit drier and tougher (though for that I’ll point to my probable overbeating of batter.  M. H. is not to be messed with).  The recipe I have for you here is moist-er than the popular Gourmet Magazine buttermilk cake recipe floating about online.  For me, it is just right.

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